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« When to Worry | Main | The Latest On China »

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Tim

Bo Guagua was at Oxford at roughly the same time as me though we were at different colleges so we had friends in common though I didn't know him personally. Quite the student politics hack even for a PPE student, and there were plenty of stories about money turning up to help his way into various positions. Apparently one society got £10,000 towards their ball courtesy of the Chinese government.

I too am surprised at how played down this story has been covered.

Son

Interesting article.

I visited your site through a link from Kids Prefer Cheese. I'd like to spend some time here but I find the layout of your page - the font color and background color - uncomfortable to view.

ac

Can you expand on the part about the suppressed coup maybe being partially true? I thought that was just tracked down to an idle microblog post?

SonsRight

I'm with Son. Time for a design update. I landed here and thought I'd been linked to a blog post from the 90s.

C

second that, good content. Layout is ... challanged.

Dave

There are some people who don't like the color scheme. Sorry about that.

Of course, you can always use an RSS feeder to view my blog. Also, most browsers have options that allow you to suppress the color scheme of a site and substitute your own.

The reason for the color scheme is that I go way back on the web. At that time there was a movement to make webpages more accessible to those that are color blind. The best color choices for that are black on white, and
white/yellow on blue/purple. This is why WordPerfect was white on blue back in the 90s. The reason for not using black on white is that it's harder on the eyes ... light on dark is easier for extended viewing.

Dave Tufte

Problems with the comments. Not sure why.

Dave Tufte

Problems with comments continue. Definitely worst on this post.

So here's multiple responses in one spot.

1) Perhaps I will upgrade the format over the summer. This scheme actually looked exciting and different when I started this blog in 2004.

2) As to the "coup", here goes:
I don't know much about that, and I'm not sure I could track it down.

When I put that post together, I was looking at standard news sites, plus some sites that translate Chinese tweet sites. But I didn't keep track of those: that post was really to clue in my students about what was going on, and I didn't want to overload them with links.

I think everyone has backed off on it being a coup.

However, there were military vehicles spotted on the streets, and there are pictures online of this.

The story I have heard is that there were people in the upper echelons of the government in Beijing who were scared for their own safety. Not sure if they were pro-Bo or anti-Bo. But someone got a limited amount of military people out on the major streets and at the major intersections.

Bret Stephens also mentioned in his piece last week in The Wall Street Journal that a major re-education campaign has been instituted in the Chinese military over the last few weeks. No one is sure what to make of that, but I take it as a sign that they may have lined up too closely with one clique or the other, and that party is trying to reassert control.

3) Thanks for your comment about Oxford Tim. If I could get inside Bo Guagua's head and walk around a bit, here's what I'd like to know. Does he know his parents wealth is ill-gotten? Does he view them as good people? And lastly, if he's spent so much time outside of China, does he still consider himself Chinese?

Dave

I don't know much about that, and I'm not sure I could track it down.

When I put that post together, I was looking at standard news sites, plus some sites that translate Chinese tweet sites. But I didn't keep track of those: that post was really to clue in my students about what was going on, and I didn't want to overload them with links.

I think everyone has backed off on it being a coup.

However, there were military vehicles spotted on the streets, and there are pictures online of this.

The story I have heard is that there were people in the upper echelons of the government in Beijing who were scared for their own safety. Not sure if they were pro-Bo or anti-Bo. But someone got a limited amount of military people out on the major streets and at the major
intersections.

Bret Stephens also mentioned in his piece last week in The Wall Street Journal that a major re-education campaign has been instituted in the Chinese military over the last few weeks. No one is sure what to make of
that, but I take it as a sign that they may have lined up too closely with one clique or the other, and that party is trying to reassert control.

Perhaps the best evidence of any of this, and one I haven't posted about because I just don't know the details, is that Zhou Yongkang appears to
be out too. He is # 9 on the Standing Committee, and controls public security. How did he screw up, if not by abusing his position in control of security?

BTW: The Epoch Times is a good way to keep on top of this stuff. Keep in mind that it is anti-government.

Dave Tufte

Comments on this post have been edited to solve problems from the server side.

CoreyLang

I am surprised that I'm even able to access this site from a school campus in China...

I've definitely noticed the power outages recently, but I have to say I'm extremely disappointed in the lack of interest that any of the University students display in this kind of news.

The truth is, that most of them have at least a small idea of what is going on, but their education system has essentially trained them to be completely apathetic toward these kinds of things. As a teacher, we are told we can't teach certain subjects in class, and we're supposed to emphasize memorization over critical thinking. (As if that will ever help anyone learn a language...)

At any rate, thank you for this insightful piece. It's ridiculously difficult to get news here. I'm in the thick of the country and it's actually harder to figure out what's going on than when I was 8000 miles away around the world.

Dave Tufte

I'm glad you could access my blog.

It was blocked by the Great Firewall a few years ago. This is the first I've heard that it is now available.

The impression I've gotten from international students here is much the same. They are surprised that I know as much as I do. Frankly, they don't see the use of it if they can't change anything.

It is not very easy to get news here either. The legacy media is just not interested in the intricacies.

Prada Taschen

Some people will not be pleased with rings of certain shapes

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